Friday, 8 May 2015

Election: The Results And The Fallout

Firstly, I feel compelled to point out I'm no expert on politics, and this is purely my opinion on the events surrounding the election.

I must say I am far from over joyed at the thought of another Conservative government, and this time around it looks like we won't even have the Lib Dems to shield the working class from some of the more outrageous suggestions! What does this mean for the working class individual? It means that once again the working class will get poorer while the rich get richer!

Anyway, I've become side tracked in the first paragraph. This isn't going to be a "why we hate the Conservatives" rant.
One thing you've got to give the Conservatives, is that their voters turn out. If the recent figures are accurate, 41.4% of eligible voters in the UK didn't register their vote. Yes 41.4%! I would be willing to bet not more than 5% of that figure would have voted Conservative.
So, why didn't the rest turn out? I would hazard a guess at one of two things. Either:
1. It was inconvenient to go to the polling station. Work, childcare issues, they couldn't be bothered, there will be hundreds of reasons.
2. They have become so disillusioned with the parties available to vote for, they don't care anymore because they are all as bad as each other.
How can we address these points?
The first one is simpler I think so I will tackle that one first.
Why, in this technological age, can't we vote online? Give each person a unique code to sign into a secure website with, and I really think more people would vote.
I know people will say it can be hacked, not secure enough etc. With the right security in place, this can be prevented. Is it really any harder to secure a website than to secure a ballot box?
People will also worry about ensuring the right people are using the code. I agree this would be harder to monitor, but the current situation is hardly fool proof. Only letting each IP address vote once would help eliminate the problem. A friend of mine forgot his voting card yesterday. He only had to give his name to vote, didn't have to show any ID or in any way prove he was who he claimed to be. Really, how secure is that?
The second point, the disillusionment, is much harder to tackle. I myself felt this way, but I voted anyway because I think it is important. How can you complain about the state of the country if you don't do your part to help change it?
In my experience, the working class man always voted Labour. Now that vote seems to be split, in England at least, between Labour and UKIP. The people voting UKIP seem to be looking at two main things. The party is fresh and new and they have a no nonsense policy on immigration.
If Labour and UKIP joined forces and created a new party that looked after working class people and tackled immigration, they would be a political super power! Maybe the disillusioned masses would then be willing to put their faith back into the system - they wanted change and they got it.
It all makes  me almost wish I lived in Scotland. The SNP has it all it seems!

So now, we sit and watch the aftermath. Labour, Lib Dems and UKIP lose their leaders. Labour and especially the Lib Dems are in a shambles. Surely there's a better way?

I think a good step in the right direction would be to start teaching basic politics in schools. If we make a conscious effort to get the next generation interested enough to care, then maybe they can put right the mess our generation caused!

What do you think? Is the country going to get worse or you happy to see the Conservatives in for another term?

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32 comments:

  1. I think you make some valid points! I have only started voting recently and for two reasons. One apathy and two my fear of not knowing enough! I think an online vote and earlier education would be really useful. xx #binkylinky

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    1. I made a comment the day before the election that I don't feel qualified to vote so I know exactly what you mean! The average person only really knows what the media want us to know! Thank you :)

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  2. Hey, I lived in Scotland under the SNP. I don't know where they're getting all this English loving from. They are well known above the border for making promises they can't keep (we'll shrink class sizes to 18 students despite the fact research show it doesn't make a difference...oh crud, we dont have enough schools) and meddling, scarily with the curriculum. When I was teaching there it felt like early days Nazi Germany, with all the Scots propaganda. Notice Scotland did not vote for independence. Those jokers would ruin us,

    #binkylinky

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    1. For me there's something honest about Nicola Sturgeon, maybe she's just a bloody good liar! I think sometimes it's like the old saying that the grass is always greener. Obviously it's a different story when you have to live with the decisions on a daily basis. It's a good point that Scotland voted against independence - as a whole the country aren't putting their faith in the SNP. I hadn't considered that. Thanks for sharing, it's eye opening to see the thoughts of someone who actually lived under the party :)

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  3. I'm not thrilled about the idea of a Tory government but maybe five years of dire circumstances is what's needed to get people to bloody vote! The turn out was shocking again. I'm 22 now and have voted both times I've been eligible
    AliceMegan

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    1. I agree 100%, people will have to face the consequences of what they've done! If 5 years of a Tory government isn't enough to force people to vote for change, then I don't know what is! If everyone actually used their vote, I think the results would have been very different :)

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  4. It's such a shame more people didn't vote. I was shocked by the election result,but people have become so disconnected from politics getting in at school level seems a good way forward

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    1. It's shocking how many people don't vote, I think by starting at school level, it might get young people interested in politics and more eager to vote.

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  5. I'm afraid that no matter who is in charge they only look after themselves good post some valid points thanks for linking to the Binkylinky

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    1. Yes, that's true, and I think that's probably part of the reason so many people didn't bother voting! Thank you, and thanks for hosting :)

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  6. I agree that politics needs to taught in school but in a less stuffy way. I think the reason why so many people didn't vote is because the choices were dire. i almost felt like letting my 3yr old choose which box to cross

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    1. I agree they are all pretty bad! They need a party that actually cares about the country rather than their own agenda! Yes, the teachings would have to be fun or interactive, try to capture young minds

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  7. We have been teaching politics to Year 4 and they have loved it. Thanks for sharing this and for linking up #bigfatlniky

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    1. That's brilliant! I think the younger children are when they are introduced to something, the more likely they will be to want to get involved.
      You're welcome and thank you for hosting :)

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  8. Some interesting observations and ideas there! Personally, I think it's really important to do your bit and vote. Having said that five years ago, I was in hospital which meant I missed out on voting. How many thousands of people didn't vote for this reason this year? Again, surly they could do something to combat this? Thank you so much for linking up to Sunday Stars xxx

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    1. Thank you :) Yes I'm sure there were some people who couldn't vote for good reason. I know you can register for a postal vote or proxy vote, but it's not like you plan your illness in advance! Something should be put in place for this situation. Maybe a volunteer with a ballot box going around the hospital? Thank you for hosting :)

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  9. Great post! Thanks for linking up to the #BinkyLinky

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    1. Thank you :) and thanks for hosting!

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  10. I was gutted! I am really quite worried about what the next five years will bring. #myfavouritepost

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    1. Me too! Everyday there seems to be some new cut to worry about :( Thanks for stopping by :)

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  11. What a great post. I too am gutted about the result and the impact on the welfare state but they are in now and hopefully they won't be too mean (I am an hopeless optimist). I think a lot of the generation that grew up under labour dislike them as much as my generation hated the Tories. Its going to be an interesting five years #sharewithme

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    1. There's nothing wrong with being optimistic! Maybe they will surprise us. You raise a very interesting point - maybe it is a case of each generation becomes disillusioned with whichever party happens to be in power as they grow up. Thanks for stopping by :)

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  12. I was also very disappointed at the result, this was the first year I voted and I did it because I thought it was important. They way our system works though meant that my vote was not heard because I live in a very Tory area. I totally agree with your point on online voting as I was wondering this too - it would be easier, and I'm sure would increase the number of people voting - especially appealing to the younger generation. Voting seems very insecure as it is, and someone I know had problems voting as they weren't on the list despite registering xx #ShareWithMe

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    1. I really think the whole system needs re-evaluating, but it won't happen. Only the party in power could bring about changes and they are not going to change a system that works for them! I hope you're friend managed to get sorted and get their vote! Thanks for stopping by :)

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  13. People need to know their voice matters, their vote will count, under first past the post voting it doesn't, the tories had roughly 30000 votes per MP, Greens and UKIP had 1.2 million and just under 4 million votes for 1 MP each (SNP had 1.5 million votes for 50 odd seats, doesn't add up does it).

    The reality is until there is proportional representation (as there is in voting for MEP's) people who would vote for "lesser" parties don't bother to vote, and in fact many who would consider these vote for someone else just to stop someone else getting in.

    Not only does this need changing but you are right the whole process could do with an update (one vote per IP doesn't work as more than one person per house would want to use it and IP's can be changed). Online or longer periods for voting needs to be brought in, but PR is the way forward.

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    1. I totally agree - the system has to change when the figures don't add up fairly. It's not just one or two votes either, it's 100s of 1000s.
      I know people who voted Labour, who don't really like Labour, they just felt they were a better option than Conservative, and felt it was always going to be a 2 horse race.
      I see your point about the IPs, it's probably not workable but there's got to be a way that's better than they current way. As you mention, even just a longer voting period would be a starting point.
      We do need a lot more PR, but honest PR (I know I'm living in cloud cuckoo land there though!).
      Thanks for stopping by :)

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  14. Interesting post - I'm sure you're right about people being too disillusioned to bother. But I would guess the reason why people can't vote online is because they could be intimidated or have their vote taken by someone else in the same household.

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    1. Thank you :) Very good point about the intimidation - I hadn't thought of that! Hmm will have to get thinking of another way lol

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  15. My understanding is that in Australia, it's illegal not to vote. I think that's taking it a little too far, but I completely agree that schools should teach children what they need to know in order to be informed participants in their democracy. Thanks for linking up with #TwinklyTuesday.

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    1. In one sense, making it illegal not to vote would solve the problem of people not voting, but I do agree it's a bit extreme, I think people would purposely spoil the ballot paper if they were forced into voting. Also a forced vote sort of undermines the whole concept of democracy. Thank you for hosting :)

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  16. Always good to share your options while I am still trying to under the UK government ways I can't really comment so different from back home. Thank you so much for linking up to Share With Me #sharewithme

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    1. I think everywhere has its own set of rules and ways with regards to elections etc - some far better than others! Thank you and thank for hosting :)

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